• January 27, 2023

Chrome Extension Different Country

The Best VPN Chrome Extensions 2021 (3 Paid & 3 Free)

If you’ve read my introductory article on Virtual Private Networks (VPNs), by now you’ll probably know that the way the function is quite simple in essence. It is the VPN‘s job to create a secure connection between your device and the information that you’re trying to access, wherever it is. Meanwhile, the VPN also must secure that information by encrypting it. Sounds simple, but not really that easy to implement. The core elements of a VPN – Security, Anonymity, Speed, and Stability – are vital to its survival. Why a VPN Extension for Google Chrome? Yet even as you read through all the information available on VPN and your eyes bug out at the prices you see, some of you might even have wondered: “What if I just want to stay anonymous and secure while browsing the internet? ” This is where the VPN browser plugin or extension comes in. In this instance, let’s talk about VPN extensions for Google Chrome. All things aside, Google Chrome has long smashed through Microsoft’s IE (or Edge, nowadays) monopoly and whisked past Firefox to lead as the most popular Internet Browser today. Depending on which statistics you believe, as of now it stands at between 59. 69% to 66. 93% market share. With such a commanding user base, it makes sense that many developers will concentrate their efforts on this platform, and indeed they have done so. Top VPN service providers such as ExpressVPN and NordVPN have dedicated VPN extensions for Chrome, allowing you to keep your browsing safe, secure and anonymous. VPN Browser Extensions Are Different from Chrome Incognito Chrome has in the past introduced an Incognito mode, in which users can open a tab and browse without having their browsing history recorded. This just means that as you browse, Chrome is deleting your browsing history and then wiping cookies that are accumulated during that session, once you close that window. This is both rudimentary and ineffective. Why? During a browsing session, information passes through more than just your browser. It moves through your router, your operating system and might even get recorded on the sites you visit. This is especially true of those who make use of streaming services. Your IP address remains open and available as well, which means any tracing can go directly back to you. Understand the Limitations of Chrome VPN Extensions VPN Extensions however, offer many similarities to VPN apps themselves. In fact, some are so similar that they simply extend features of main VPN apps. For the most part, they are intended to offer greater convenience and control over your web browsing experience. The most important thing to know is that almost all VPN extensions are acting merely as proxies. This means that they only affect traffic passing through the browser itself. The only two exceptions to this are devices running on Chromes OS or the extensions that leverage on Native Messaging. Suffice to say, the exceptions are rarer, so take the power of ANY browser-based VPNs with a pinch of salt. 1. Only your Chrome traffic is secured Although browser extensions offer similar benefits to full-fledged VPN software, there are key differences. Therefore, VPN extensions are usually simply called proxies. The VPN-like benefits offered by proxies only apply to your browser, in this case, Chrome. Other apps on your computer which make use of your network will have their data traffic remain unsecured. This also extends to other browsers you might use sometimes. For example, if you have the proxy extension for Chrome and launch Microsoft Edge, the data traffic on Edge will not be secured by your Chrome extension. Full VPN apps encrypt data traffic on a system-wide level. This means that your single VPN app will protect data traffic from all parts of your system – browser, other applications, and even the Operating System itself. 2. Limited encryption Let me start this off with a generic statement: Most proxies today (not just VPN proxies) only make use of SOCKS and HTTP/HTTPS protocols. To bring that to the browser extension scene, what that means is that when using SOCKS and HTTP, there is zero encryptions. If you use a VPN extension that offers the HTTPS protocol, that’s basically SSL-level encryption. This is especially something to take note of for 100% free VPN proxies. I’ve noticed that even for paid VPN extension services, not all country servers offer the HTTPS protocol. 3. Limited support Unfortunately, this is similar across the board, unless you’re using a proxy that is provided as a value-added service by a full VPN service provider such as ExpressVPN or TorGuard. Free VPN extension users mostly must make do with a FAQ, community-based support or email support (if you’re lucky). Be prepared to muddle through issues on your own for this one. Benefits of Using VPN Extensions While there are differences, proxies have niche uses as well in some scenarios. Special Case UsesBecause of their more limited functionality, proxies tend to be lighter on system resource usages. Take for example if you’re using a Chromebook – you might a) have no other choice and b) need to conserve system resources. Specialized Risk ControlThere is also the argument that Internet browsers are one of the most common targets that hackers tend to target. All browsers are prone to security risk, the only difference being to what degree. If you don’t want a fully-fledged VPN taking up resources, you can settle for defending your data and hiding your identity with a VPN proxy extension. Ad Blocking Some VPN extensions come packaged in with other services such as Ad blocking, tracker avoidance or cookie management. This helps strip the junk out of the net before it reaches you but may also result in some strange looking web pages (sometimes). Preventing WebRTC LeaksFirefox and Chrome both have a security vulnerability that may result in your IP address being leaked. This could of course be overcome by using a full-on VPN app, but some VPN extension providers have now built in WebRTC leak prevention into their extensions. How Do We Choose a VPN for Chrome? Although Chrome VPN extensions are mainly proxy extensions, I feel that if they adhere to the core principles of VPNs that are critical they should be, for the most part, fine. The key remains the same: privacy, security, and speed. If you’re not convinced that the selection process is sound and that any old VPN extension will do, let me share with your something I came across the other day: Hoxx VPN. As I went through their documentation, I ended up wondering why on earth anyone would sign up with their service, even on a free account. This VPN collects log information, blocks SMTP ports, collections personal information, device information, employs tracking technologies, states that its users must agree to information sharing with law enforcement agencies or governments … the list goes on. If by now you are as horrified as I was, then you’ll know how important your choice of VPN partner is. So, with that, let’s look at some of the top Chrome VPN extensions. Top 3 Paid Chrome VPN Extensions Although I say paid, I must mention also that most VPN browser extensions you’ll find online are free to install. However, some will require an actual paid subscription to the service before allowing you to make use of those extensions (essentially making them paid extensions). Without further ado, here are our top 3 paid extension choices. Overall Performance Very Good Key Features 4, 400+ servers Double DNS 6+ devices PGP for comm. privacy Multiple protocols “Nord comes together in a very pretty package & offers solid performance through thousands of VPN servers. ” The NordVPN Chrome extension is a little bit of an odd duck. Remember where I said that ExpressVPN is great for those who like a click and go experience? Well, the NordVPN extension is similar, but takes it a little bit too far. In fact, there’s very little you can manipulate in the app. As far as selecting servers go, all you can choose is the country. For example, in trying to connect to a US server, it’s even-odds which state server I’ll end up hooked up to. Slightly annoying. While I did get connected quickly to a US server, the connection was so bad that speed test couldn’t even select a server for me. The Malaysia connection speed was appalling, and I finally ended up getting a good speed reading out of Singapore. The Good Clean and simple interface Very fast server connections The Bad No state-specific location choices Some servers have terrible connections Overall Performance Excellent Key Features Easy to use Global VPN network VPN kill switch DNS leak protection WebRTC blocking “A potent combination of security, anonymity & performance on all major platforms. ” As with its apps the ExpressVPN Chrome extension is fuss-free and easy to use. There are settings you can tweak, such as location spoofing and WebRTC blocking, but for those who like to click and go, this is a great extension for you. There is an option to configure your Windows app in the extension but clicking on that launches the Windows app and you do the configuration changes there – not very impressive. Speeds on the extension are fair to middling, still, could be worse. Although I whine a little about the extension opening the app on some configuration changes, while annoying, this extends the power of the extension. Fantastic for those seeking absolute privacy and security, while at the same time working for those seeking a true lightweight browser extension. Overall, I favour ExpressVPN‘s extension because it’s backed by the company’s full VPN service. They can open up new worlds to users through a specialized network of over 2, 000 servers worldwide and have rated top of the bunch in our VPN tests so far. The Good Easy to use Has HTTPS everywhere Decent server speeds The Bad Slow server connection Slow upload speeds Overall Performance Excellent Key Features 1040+ servers Multi-Hop connection Supports many platforms No logs “Frills-free and consistent in performance, Surfshark is making its name as a strong upcoming contender. ” Just like their Windows and Mobile apps, the Surfshark Chrome extension is quite pleasing to use. It feels extremely lightweight and is very responsive to commands. Connections are made quickly and easily with no need to deal with settings or anything else. Basically – it simply worked out of the box. The only thing you’ll need to do is click to turn it on and then choose what server you want to connect to. Speed tests show that it performs just as ably as the full Windows application does. Personally, I have never been much of a fan of Chrome extensions. I feel that they add bulk to what is already a memory hog, but the Surfshark Chrome extension just feels right. Of course, you’ll need an existing account to work with it. The Good Runs independently Quite lightweight Fast speeds How Are the FREE Chrome VPN Extensions? I’ve said this over and again before when it comes to VPN providers and I’ll repeat it here again now: don’t be overly fooled by the label ‘free’. Companies that provide free services must make up for the revenue somehow. When snapping up ‘free’ offers, you are often putting something at risk – be it your privacy or losing control over your data. Some services even go as far as to resort to malware or website redirects to earn money off you. Consider this fair warning. Key Features AES 256-bit encryption Multiple devices Worldwide network Vigilant mode “Owned by McAfee which can attest to its security standards, TunnelBear can keep you safe while spoofing your location. ” Personally, I think that the TunnelBear VPN extension has a fantastic sign up process. Once you install the extension, you’ll be brought to a sign-up page that asks you to register a username and password. The catch is that the free account will only net you 500MB of encrypted bandwidth a month. That’s usually nowhere near enough for most people. Their server speeds vary a lot apparently, and while I got only mediocre speeds out of their US servers, Singapore was lightning fast! The Good Painless sign up and connection Some awesome speeds on selected servers The Bad Varying speeds on different country servers Free 500MB per month quota not enough for even email Key Features 2, 000+ servers Multiple devices Unlimited data transfer Split tunneling “PureVPN is available on multi-platform as well as has its own Chrome Plugin for ultimate convenience. ” PureVPN is actually the provider of full VPN services, meaning it has its OS-based apps, and it also offers the PureVPN Chrome extension for free. The chrome extension in my opinion is pretty much as good as any freebie would reasonably come. First of all, it offers users a very basic anonymity service for absolutely nothing, all you need is to sign up for an account. However, this service does come with a few limitations that I consider are fair for the price you pay (which is nothing). You won’t be able to select which country to connect to except for Romania, Australia and Sweden. Most geo-blocking apps such as Netflix US, Hulu US or BBC’s iPlayer won’t work unless you sign up for a premium account. On the other hand, basic web-surfing works well and there is also WebRTC protection. In fact, with PureVPN’s Chrome extension, browsing speeds I found were higher than usual, especially for free services. The Good Fast browsing speeds No bandwidth quota The Bad Aside from basic web browsing, almost everything else requires a premium upgrade Key Features One click connect Multiple devices No logs 360° protection 30+ global locations “Combine ZenMate with its very own Chrome plugin & take full advantage of its top-notch encryption. ” As far as Chrome VPN extensions go, ZenMate is pretty good. Speeds are decent, there are tons of extra options and stuff you don’t normally see in free extensions. However, that only lasts for a week. You see, ZenMate works on the ‘lure them in’ principle, meaning when you sign up you automatically start off on their premium service. After a week of this trial, you’re dumped back down to their free model. Not exactly bad, but annoying. In any case, they offer strong and stable server connections with fast speeds, so I have little to complain about. The Good Very fast and stable Unlimited bandwidth The Bad Annoying banner ads in extension Conclusion: Should I get a VPN extension? At the end of the day, I feel that I must again stress the key difference between VPN apps and Chrome VPN extensions (or VPN extensions for any browsers, actually). VPN apps secure all network traffic from your device, browser extensions only secure browser-based traffic. Since most devices today including laptops, smartphones and tablets often have many apps installed on them that make use of network traffic, merely securing your browser-based traffic isn’t nearly enough to stay anonymous. Here are two key takeaways I’d like for you to consider: To completely protect all your network traffic, you need a VPN app. Using a free plugin or browser extension means you’re likely paying with your privacy. If what you’re after is merely to browse anonymously, then perhaps a Chrome browser extension is for you. However, since the best VPN extensions need you subscribed to their service to work, I highly recommend you install a VPN app instead.
The 5 Best Free Chrome VPNs to Unblock Any Website - Nira

The 5 Best Free Chrome VPNs to Unblock Any Website – Nira

Co-founder of Nira
Advertisers, governments, schools, and companies are watching where you go online. While advertisers just want to follow you around and sell you stuff, your school or company might block certain websites so you can’t access them.
This is often done in a heavy-handed, thoughtless way. Either by using algorithms to block entire topics or by blacklisting individual sites. The Chinese government, for example, blocks every Google domain. That includes Gmail. If you’re traveling to China and use Gmail, it’s nearly impossible to do your job while traveling.
You can also find that you’re barred from websites and content based on your location. Netflix, for example, serves completely different content based on your location. You might be halfway through an amazing series and then lose access by traveling to another country. The reverse is worse. I’ve come across amazing shows while traveling, got halfway through, and then lost access once I got home when I didn’t even realize the country access was different.
So how do we get around these restrictions?
Use a VPN (Virtual Private Network).
Strictly speaking, there’s no such thing as “Chrome VPN, ” but plenty of VPNs have a Chrome extension that lets you control the VPN through your browser. Many are completely free too. If you want easy access to the sites you want, wherever you are, they’re great choices.
First, a word of caution…
Free vs Paid VPNs
Paid VPNs are subscription services. They own servers, have employees, and incur other costs in order to provide the VPN service. Free VPNs get their revenue elsewhere. Some sell your data, some show you ads, some are freemium versions of paid VPNs.
In general, if you’re worried about privacy and security, get a paid VPN. I highly recommend going with ExpressVPN.
If you’re not worried about your private data and just want to get around site blocks without having to pay anything, consider one of the free options.
The 5 Best Free Chrome VPNs
1: CyberGhost – Best for Regular Unblocking
Free Server Locations: Germany, Netherlands, Romania, and United States
Paid Server Locations: 4, 800 servers across 58 countries
Encryption standards: 256-bit AES
Privacy: Logs connection attempts but anonymizes them. Doesn’t log traffic or IP addresses
Connection Speed: Won’t significantly slow down most users’ connection speed.
Pricing: Chrome extension is free. Subscriptions start at $12. 99 a month or $5. 99 a month billed annually.
How it works
Install from the Chrome store and fire it up from the extension bar. Choose your server location by clicking on the one that’s currently active.
Under the hood, CyberGhost’s Chrome extension is built on the Ethereum blockchain, meaning it’s one of the most private options out there.
They do warn you upfront that “this browser plugin is not secure when accessing Flash content and does not protect you from webRTC leaks. ” It’s also not good at unblocking streaming sites.
2: Browsec – Most Convenient
Browsec is faster than most free VPNs, secure, and easy to use.
Free Server Locations: Netherlands, Singapore, United Kingdom, and United States
Paid Server Locations: 12 locations
Privacy: Doesn’t collect personally identifying information but does collect meta-data. It is location in Russia so be warned.
Connection Speed: Up to 100MB/s but you’re more likely to get speeds of 10-15MB/s
Pricing: Has a freemium plan. Premium subscriptions start at $4. 99 per month or $3. 33 per month billed annually
Install the extension and then click on it. You don’t need to be signed in or have an account to use the Chrome extension. Location is reliable between websites, there are plenty of servers to choose from, and the interface is simple and intuitive.
I strongly recommend not using this service for anything sensitive. Since it’s located in Russia, I would assume anything you’re doing is being tracked.
3: TunnelBear – Best for Infrequent Usage
TunnelBear is a real VPN with a Chrome extension. Unlike most premium VPN services, TunnelBear has a free account with a data limit instead of a time limit. If you want a real VPN’s power and control, but only occasionally, TunnelBear will work for you.
Free Server Locations: Access to all paid servers
Paid Server Locations: Servers in 20 countries
Encryption standards: 256 bit symmetric encryption
Privacy: Logs connections but not traffic or IP addresses.
Connection Speed: Fast, connections as 50MB/s even on free plans
Pricing: Free accounts are free forever, paid accounts start at $9. 99 per month or $4. 99 per month billed annually
Install the extension, click on it and you’ll be asked to create an account. All you need is your email address, and when you confirm your free account you’ll get access to the 500MB a month that comes with a free account.
Be warned, doesn’t play that well with some other Chrome extensions — when we tested it, Ghostery and OneTab crashed.
4: HotSpot Shield – Easiest and Most Reliable Unblocking
HotSpot Shield is a freemium tool built around its Chrome extension, with no data or time cap.
Free Server Locations: Germany, Russia, Canada, and Netherlands
Paid Server Locations: India, Singapore, UK, France, and the US are available
Encryption standards: 256 bit AES encryption
Privacy: Collects aggregate activity logs but not traffic or IP addresses
Connection Speed: Usually fast enough but it will slow noticeably for more distant servers
Pricing: Has permanent free accounts, paid subscriptions start at $12. 99 per month or $9. 99 per month billed annually
Install the extension and you’re guided through a five-screen onboarding flow in the extension itself before you connect. You can choose your server by clicking on the one you’re connected to.
You’ll also see options for a cookie blocker, malware blocker, RTC protection, and a tool called Sword that creates spoof traffic while you browse to confuse trackers trying to identify you.
5: Windscribe – Most Flexible Server Locations
Free Server Locations: US, Canada, France, Germany, Netherlands, Norway, Romania, Switzerland, Hong Kong, and the UK
Paid Server Locations: Wider range of global servers as well as dedicated “Windflix” servers specifically designed to unblock Netflix
Encryption standards: 256-bit AES encryption
Privacy: Collects connection logs but not traffic or IP addresses
Connection Speed: Struggles with uptime and distant servers do display a noticeable lag.
Pricing: Freemium plans, paid subscriptions start at $9 per month or $4. 08 per month billed annually
Install and you’re prompted to sign up. Once you create your free account, you’re automatically connected.
You get 2GB of free data with WindScribe, but they do their best to help you make the most of it. The default setting is “Cruise Control, ” which doesn’t use any of your data allowance until you encounter a blocked website. When that happens, Windscribe flicks itself on automatically to get you access, choosing the appropriate server location to get you access.
The custom-tailored servers for Netflix are great too. If your primary goal is to get access to different Netflix regions, definitely consider this VPN, it makes that process super easy.
What if the website you want to view is still blocked?
Websites like YouTube and Netflix are engaged in a kind of arms race with VPN users, many VPNs are blocked by these sites. If you’re doing a lot of unblocking, or you want to unblock sites that are particularly VPN-proof, go with a paid VPN.
ExpressVPN – Best Paid VPN
Living up to its billing, this is the fastest full-featured VPN out there. It has an effective stealth mode so watchers won’t even know you’re using a VPN, solid encryption, and reliably unblocks everything on the internet.
There’s a Chrome extension but you need a subscription to use it. The desktop and mobile apps are easy to use too. It’s priced at $12. 99 a month or $9. 99 per month for a six-month subscription.
If you’re going to be using a VPN heavily, I highly recommend going with ExpressVPN.
How to Change Your Location in Chrome & Firefox (spoof ...

How to Change Your Location in Chrome & Firefox (spoof …

When you launch Firefox or Chrome browsers, they automatically employ geolocation services that can pinpoint where you’re located. This is used for various purposes, including enabling you to use map services, tagging social media posts with your location, and serving targeted ads based on where you are at a given time. However, there are plenty of situations in which you’d prefer to hide your location and even change (spoof) it, such as when you want to access geo-restricted content or simply maintain your privacy.
Thankfully, there are various methods you can use to do this, including using a VPN, manually spoofing your location, or using a dedicated browser extension. You may need to use more than one method to bypass multiple detection methods. We’ll delve into all of these options in this post.
How Firefox and Chrome can detect your location
First, let’s take a look at how Firefox and Chrome know where you are.
One of the easiest ways for Firefox, Chrome, and any other online service to tell where you’re located is through your IP address. This is a unique set of digits (and symbols in the newer IPv6) that identifies each computer connected to the internet. Part of the IP address can be used to determine your location. As such, masking your real IP address and replacing it with another one can spoof your location, making it appear that you’re located somewhere else.
However, some browsers have other methods that can decipher where you are. For example, they can use nearby wifi networks to geolocate a device even without an IP address. Turning off wifi and Bluetooth can be one option, but the likelihood is that you’ll need one or both of these, so it’s simply not an option for most users.
Using a VPN will enable you to easily change your IP address, replacing your existing one with another from a location of your choice. However, this may not bypass other geolocation services used by the browser. To overcome this issue, you can manually change your location in your browser or use an extension such as Location Guard.
Use a VPN to change your location in Firefox or Chrome
A Virtual Private Network (VPN) works by encrypting your internet traffic and tunneling it through an intermediary server. The two major benefits of a VPN are:
Encryption: The encryption factor means your internet traffic is completely secure and no one can decipher it, even if they manage to intercept it. This applies to ISPs, government agencies, cybercriminals, and anyone else who might be snooping on your activity.
Location spoofing: Because your traffic is tunneled through an intermediary server, you will be assigned an IP address from that server. When using a VPN, you can choose the location of the server you connect to and hence select where your IP address is from.
Note: the VPN will only spoof your location in terms of your IP address. So even when you’re using a VPN, your browser might be able to detect your location. As such, you may need to still manually spoof your location within the browser or use an extension like Location Guard (more on that below).
You’ll probably notice that some VPNs come with dedicated browser extensions for Firefox, Chrome, and other browsers. These can be great for location spoofing, but note that most of these do not encrypt your internet traffic when used alone.
One extension that’s a bit different from the others is the addon provided by ExpressVPN. Its Chrome and Firefox extensions act as remote controls for the device-level VPN apps, but they also automatically adjust the browser’s geolocation services. As such, the detected location matches that of the VPN server you’re connected to. This means that you don’t need to do anything else except connect to your chosen VPN server.
How to spoof your location using a VPN
Even if you’ve never used a VPN before, setting one up is very straightforward. Here’s how to change your IP address in Firefox or Chrome with a VPN:
Choose a provider, select a subscription term, and submit your payment. (We recommend NordVPN)
Download the appropriate VPN software for your device. Most reputable VPN providers offer native apps for Windows, MacOS, iOS, and Android.
Log in using your username and password (which will be provided when you signed up).
Connect to a VPN server in the location of your choice. For example, if you want to watch US Netflix, you’d select a US server. You’ll now have a different IP address which makes it appear you’re in that location.
Bear in mind that not all VPNs can unblock geo-restricted sites. Many sites, including streaming, gaming, and gambling services, have methods to detect when you are using a proxy (VPNs are included in this). Notably, many free VPNs are unable to bypass such proxy detectors. If you’re looking to access a specific service, it’s worth checking with the VPN provider if it’s able to provide access, before signing up (you can check here for VPNs working with Neflix, Amazon Prime, BBC iPlayer and Hulu).
WANT TO TRY THE TOP VPN RISK FREE? NordVPN is offering a fully-featured risk-free 30-day trial if you sign up at this page. This lets you use a zero-logs VPN with servers in 59 countries, without restriction, for a month — more than enough time to tell if it’s a good fit or not.
There are no hidden terms—just contact support within 30 days if you decide NordVPN isn’t right for you and you’ll get a full refund. Start your NordVPN trial here.
The best VPN for changing your location in Firefox and Chrome: NordVPN
We’ve put a plethora of the top-rated VPNs through some rigorous testing, and NordVPN comes out on top each time. Indeed, this is the VPN provider we recommend for use with Firefox and Chrome. Based in Panama, NordVPN operates a network of more than 5, 000 servers spanning 59 countries.
It provides users with exceptionally fast, reliable connections that are ideal for streaming, and is capable of unlocking a ton of geo-restricted sites. You can easily stream Netflix US (and other Netflix libraries), Hulu, HBO, BBC iPlayer, Amazon Prime Video, and lots more. If you have any issues finding the right server to connect to, a 24/7 live chat customer service agent is always available to help.
Included in every NordVPN subscription are apps for Windows, MacOS, Linux, iOS, and Android. Chrome and Firefox users can download dedicated browser extensions which can be used as remote controls for the appropriate VPN app.
When you connect to a server, NordVPN’s browser extension will automatically change your Firefox or Chrome geolocation data to match the VPN location you’re connected to. This means that as long as you’re using the VPN, you never have to worry about changing any settings manually; just connect to the appropriate server and you’re good to go.
NordVPN is just as impressive when it comes to privacy and security. It uses 256-bit encryption which is considered “military-grade, ” and this comes with perfect forward secrecy. You also get the best leak protection in the industry and a built-in kill switch. This means you can rest assured your data will always remain safe inside the encrypted tunnel.
Read our full review of NordVPN.
NordVPN isn’t the only excellent provider available for use with Firefox and Chrome. Other high-quality options include ExpressVPN and Surfshark.
How to manually spoof your location
If you’re just setting up Firefox or Chrome, as part of the setup process, you’ll be asked if you want to allow location services. You can simply deny this request, and for Firefox, you can skip the first set of instructions below.
But chances are you’re doing this after initial setup. In this case, you’ll need to turn the geolocation services off manually. Plus, it doesn’t help with actually changing your location, so you’ll need to do that manually too.
Manually change your location in Firefox
Here’s how to spoof your location in Firefox:
Type about:config in your browser. A warning will pop up to tell you about the risk involved in altering the advanced settings. As long as you’re happy to go ahead, click I accept the risk!
Look for the setting geo. enabled.
The value column should read “true. ” Double click it to set it to “false. ”
Note that this will only stop Firefox tracking your location. To set a new location, you can continue with the following steps:
Still in about:config, look for the setting
Change this to the location you want to “be” in. To do this, you have to enter a specific longitude and latitude value. You can use the following line of code but replace the values: data:application/json, {“location”: {“lat”: 40. 7590, “lng”: -73. 9845}, “accuracy”: 27000. 0}
The above example from a Stack Exchange user will put you in Times Square, but you can change it to wherever you want by tweaking the latitude and longitude values. There are plenty of tools to help you find out these numbers such as GPS Coordinates and
Note that if you ever want to revert back to the default settings, you can right click anywhere on the row and select Reset.
Manually change your location in Chrome
In Chrome, you can use the following instructions to spoof your location:
In a browser window, hit Ctrl+Shift+I (for Windows) or Cmd+Option+I (for MacOS). This will open the Chrome Developer Tools window.
Hit Esc, then click the Console menu (three dots to the left of Console in the lower portion of the screen).
Select Sensors and change the Geolocation dropdown to Custom location…
Enter any latitude and longitude you want.
Alternatively, you can choose one of the preset options in the Geolocation menu, including Berlin, Mumbai, or San Francisco.
Note that for the location override to work in Chrome, you have to keep the developer tools open and stay in the same browser window. If you open a new window, it will revert back to your original location. This is different to Firefox where you can open multiple windows and still have your location spoofed.
To check if these processes have worked in either browser, you can test it using a tool such as BrowserLeaks.
In the above screenshot, you can see that we managed to spoof our location to make it appear that we were actually in Times Square.
Use the Location Guard addon
If you’re happy to let an addon do the work for you, you might want to try Location Guard. This extension has two major uses:
Lower accuracy of location detection: If you’re concerned about privacy but still want to appear that you’re in the same general location, you can use this extension to hide your exact location. This means you can still enjoy the perks of geolocation services (such as local search results), without having to let browsers and third parties know exactly where you are. You can choose the level of “noise” added depending on how much you want to mask your location.
Spoof your location: Another option is to use Location Guard’s Fixed Location feature which basically does what we did earlier: enables you to select an exact location you want to appear to be in.
To use the Fixed Location feature:
Install the Location Guard extension for Firefox or Chrome.
Go to Options and change Default Level to Use fixed location.
Go to Fixed Location and choose a location on the map. You can either find your desired location manually or enter an address in the search bar. Just make sure that you “place” the pointer in your desired location — you’ll have to actually click on the map to put it in place.
Location Guard’s setup is an arguably easier option than the manual steps we outlined earlier. Plus, the extension offers an attractive and intuitive interface. Although, there is the issue that you’re using another extension, so it might not be the most ideal option for privacy-conscious users. While it worked for us, there have been complaints from some users that it hasn’t worked consistently.
WebRTC blocking
One more factor to be concerned about is WebRTC leaks. WebRTC, or Web Real-Time Communication helps facilitate audio and video browser-to-browser communication. It is built into many browsers, including Firefox and Chrome. Even when using a VPN, WebRTC can pose a risk by potentially exposing your real IP address.
Many VPNs build WebRTC protection into their software, but this is often limited to actual VPN apps, and doesn’t typically carry over to browser extensions. Some do include WebRTC leak protection in their extensions, such as NordVPN, but if you’re going with another provider, you might need to take extra precautions.
Is it possible to disable WebRTC in your browser to avoid the issue altogether. Here’s how to disable WebRTC leaks in Firefox:
Enter about:config in your Firefox address bar.
Find erconnection. enabled.
If the Value column says “true, ” then double-click the row so that it reads “false. ”
There is no similar method to do this in Chrome. However, there are extensions available that can prevent WebRTC leaks, including WebRTC Leak Prevent.
You can check to see if these methods have worked using BrowserLeaks.
Can I use a DNS proxy instead of a VPN?
It is possible to use a DNS proxy service in place of a VPN for the IP address component of location spoofing. However, you should bear in mind two major differences between VPNs and proxy servers.
The first is that a DNS proxy will only change your location if you’re visiting a site that requires geo-unblocking. For any other site, the proxy won’t kick in, and you’ll get a direct connection to that site. This means if you want privacy, a DNS proxy won’t provide it. Plus, while a DNS proxy can technically help you unblock geo-restricted content, the reality is that many are unable to bypass some heavy proxy crackdowns such as those rolled out by Netflix and BBC iPlayer.
The second big difference is that most DNS proxy services won’t encrypt your internet traffic. This means that if it’s intercepted, anyone can decipher your information. If privacy and security are concerns, then you’re better off with a VPN.
Can I use a free VPN to change my IP address?
Free VPNs will pop up all the time in your search, but these are generally not good options. For starters, in a similar vein to DNS proxies, they are less likely to be able to bypass the geo-restriction measures taken by certain sites. So chances are you won’t be able to access your favorite shows, movies, or games. What’s’ more, servers are few and far between and tend to be overloaded. Even if you can bypass restrictions, you could end up with a slow, unreliable connection.
Additionally, free VPNs tend to have rather strict data limits. If you’re looking to effectively use a VPN service for anything more than basic web browsing, you’ll find a free VPN is extremely limited.
If you’re more concerned about privacy and security, free VPNs fall short there too. Various services have been known to track user activity, sell information to third parties, and inject ads into the sites you visit. Some fail to encrypt your data and could even carry malware. It’s definitely worth the few extra bucks for a top-rated provider.
Wrapping Up
Because browsers have multiple methods in place to detect your location, to truly spoof your location, you may need to use a couple of methods. Our recommended solution is to use a VPN and manually change your location in your browser. If you find that too cumbersome (it’s a little more difficult in Chrome), then trying the Location Guard extension alongside a VPN could be a very viable solution.

Frequently Asked Questions about chrome extension different country

How do you make Chrome think you are in a different country?

Manually change your location in ChromeIn a browser window, hit Ctrl+Shift+I (for Windows) or Cmd+Option+I (for MacOS). … Hit Esc, then click the Console menu (three dots to the left of Console in the lower portion of the screen).Select Sensors and change the Geolocation dropdown to Custom location…More items…•Apr 2, 2021

How do I get American Netflix extension on Chrome?

Simply click and install PureVPN Chrome VPN extension for Netflix US with this easy guide.1 Click the PureVPN icon at the top-right corner of the browser.2 Enter your PureVPN credentials and click login.3 Click Select Popular Websites.4 Click Netflix US from the list.5 That’s it. Netflix US will open in a new tab.Oct 26, 2018

Which free VPN extension is best for Chrome?

The best Chrome VPN extensions in 2021ExpressVPN. Best all-round Chrome VPN and beyond. Specifications. … Windscribe. Powerful and free Chrome proxy extension. Specifications. … Private Internet Access. Chrome VPN with tons features. … CyberGhost. Great free Chrome VPN. … Hotspot Shield. Incredible speeds and a decent free option.6 days ago

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